Fencing pictogram ©ATHOC Fencing

05/23/13

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Wheelchair Fencing

Fencing is a sport that calls for adaptability, inventiveness, good organisation, and patience. In order to master it, the fencer spends long hours practicing.

Jadwiga Polasik of Poland on her way to winning Gold in the women's class A Fencing final at the 2000 Paralympic Games. © Nick Wilson/AllsportThe athletes in Paralympic fencing are those with locomotor disabilities. They compete on wheelchairs. During a bout the wheelchairs are fixed to the ground. This nevertheless allows the fencer the freedom to execute rapidly alternating movements.

The sport is governed by the rules of FIE, the International Fencing Federation, and of the Fencing Committee of the International Paralympic Committee.
There are five fencing events in the Olympic Games, and each can be an individual event or a team event:

 

Foil (Men’s). Class A and class B
Foil (Women’s). Class A and class B
Epée (Men’s). Class A and class B

Epée (Women’s). Class A and class B

Sabre (Men’s). Class A and class B

Fencing at the 2004 Paralympic Games

Fencing at the Paralympic Games in Athens will be held at the Fencing Hall - Preliminaries Terrain of the Helleniko Olympic Complex. The competition programme will be completed within six days, from 18 to 24 September 2004.

 
     

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This site was last updated 04/30/12